Blog

On Batch Work

On Batch Work

2017 will go down in family history as the year we survived two months without a dryer, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. One day a few years ago our then-eleven year-old washer kicked the bucket. It wasn’t a good time. I was […]

Of Roosters and Men: Bali’s Livestock Market

Of Roosters and Men: Bali’s Livestock Market

I went to the Livestock Market looking for pigs. I had it on good authority that there would be some, so I rolled out of bed at five in the morning to make the hour drive from Ubud in time to arrive just after the […]

On The Annual Marathon

On The Annual Marathon

I planted peas this weekend.

On Saturday night, in a moment of weakness and unrealistic hope, I dumped a quarter pound of seed leftover from 2012 in a mason jar, topped it off with water and left it on the windowsill overnight with the intention of putting them in the ground the very next day. I had been taking inventory of and cleaning out my seed stash when I came across the envelope tucked between an equally old half pound of bush bean seed and a collection of rare heirloom tomato seeds sent to me by an avid gardener and collector of odd varieties out west. Sunday I dug two short trenches and dumped them in thick, each seed right next to its neighbor, before folding the dirt back over top. (more…)

Indonesia: Starvation Amid Abundance

Indonesia: Starvation Amid Abundance

The middle of the morning food market in Ubud, Bali, Indonesia is perhaps an odd place to begin a story about malnutrition. Baskets of fresh fish in beautiful hues of silver and blue line the barely-more-than-one-person-wide footpath through the temporary stalls that pop up here […]

A Few Favorite Things: Lengthening Days

A Few Favorite Things: Lengthening Days

It’s 9˚ here as I type this. We’re at the bottom of another valley in the winter rollercoaster. It’ll be 40˚ again by Wednesday. One evening this week one of our girls noticed the faint blue of the sky at evening chores. “Isn’t it normally […]

A Few Favorite Things: Looking Forward

A Few Favorite Things: Looking Forward

When working sheep with Border Collies every shepherd has a “look back” command. It may or may not be those exact words — or the most common whistle for it — but the intention is universal. Border Collies, by default, do very little looking back. They are not like humans; they have no navel and they’re not prone to gazing even if they did. They don’t dwell on what was. They focus with great intensity on what is in front of them. They look forward and move forward and think forward. They focus forward on the task — the sheep or cows or hogs — at hand, the here, the now. So when there’s a sheep or three left behind, hidden over a hill or within a patch of trees you have to remind them. weet, WEET, Wheeeoooo Look back! Look back there now!

It’s not a bad way to go about your days. In fact, it’s become one of my favorite ways lately. Only ways, even. Centered. Steady. Focused… forward.

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Dark Days Dinner: Tavern-Style Rump Roast

Dark Days Dinner: Tavern-Style Rump Roast

The solstice has come and gone. The days are lengthening, but the daylight comes in sluggish increments at first. The average daily temperature won’t start rising in earnest again until February and then only in fits and starts until about April. With the distraction of […]

The Great Winter Rollercoaster of 2016-17

The Great Winter Rollercoaster of 2016-17

Autumn held on longer than I anticipated this year, gracing us with forty and even some fifty-degree weather well into December. Winter peeked out for just over a week mid-month, but otherwise largely left us alone until yesterday. Now, as I write this, my fingers […]

Last Call: 2016 Lamb

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The best and worst thing about living on a small farm is eating what you produce. It’s the best thing because the things you produce are so delicious there’s no comparison to their grocery store counterparts. You cannot buy meat, fruits and veggies like this in the store. But it’s also the worst thing, because you get spoiled so you don’t even want to eat anything else. And the problem there is that it means you either have to raise a wide variety of foods or bore yourself of the same old meals pretty quick.

For us, being bored was never an option. When we became bored of chicken, we added turkey. When we became tired of chicken and turkey, we added pork. When we became bored of chicken and turkey and pork, we added beef. When we became bored of chicken and turkey and pork and beef, we added lamb.

Now, in our second year with lamb we’re relishing the experimentation a new-to-us meat brings to our kitchen and the kitchens of our customers. Of course, as with all things, lamb is seasonal and so we’re putting out our last call to join us in this fun new farm-to-fork adventure until next fall. If you’d like to try out our second ever crop of Pure Michigan, pastured lamb, get in touch by phone or email. We have a limited number of whole and half lamb shares available. Wholes are $1.50 per pound liveweight, plus processing. Halves are $1.75 per pound liveweight, plus processing.

These won’t last, all will be gone before the first of February.

A Few Favorite Things: December 13

Read: I bought Consider the Fork by Bee Wilson years ago, read half of it and then stuck it up on my shelf. That’s to no fault of the book itself; I have a bad habit of half-reading books. I get bored quickly. The silverlining […]